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Support our crafters

These happy chaps arrived from Kathmandu in the late summer ready to settle in new homes. Craft fairs are taking place in Celbridge on 23rd November and again on 26th and 27th November.

Craft sales also taking place in Limerick between now and Christmas, will post dates closer to the events.

Santa_Cone _crop_011

These are part of our income generating programmes in Nepal and can support the many families who make them. Sizes 43cm, 34cm, 27cm, in 3 colours, selling at €10, €8 and €6.

Also batik cards for sale.batik-cards-small

HOPE: It’s not just a buzzword

Article and photos by Sarah Winterburn.

hope-is-not-a-buzzword

Late one evening in July, I found myself descending rapidly in an airplane over the Kathmandu valley. The city looked totally unlike any I had seen before. Walking out onto the heated street, the life of the place struck me. People everywhere. No surface seemed untouched. As I travelled south, rural farmland replaced crowded cityscape – rice paddies and dirt tracks.

WELCOME TO NEPAL
How did I end up here? After a lifetime of hearing stories about Nepal from my parents, who spent the first years of their married lives there, I had been given the opportunity to visit. I would be staying at Lalgadh Hospital – the busiest leprosy hospital in the world – set up by Nepal Leprosy Trust (NLT), a Christian organisation inspired by Jesus’ compassion to serve the poor and sick. Their aim is to empower those affected by leprosy and other disadvantaged people.

Leprosy destroys the life of a patient both physically and socially, so NLT focuses on two primary aspects of the rehabilitation. First, they must deal with the physical illness… Read the full article here

LLSC’s Community Program

MONSOON, hot, wet, muddy and an awesome Community Program.

Stretching out a compassionate hand to thousands of leprosy-affected, marginalised, untouchables (Dalits) and others in poverty and dire need.

Flooding in the Terai - not so far from Lalgadh - hundreds have lost their lives during the past week. August 2016.
Flooding in the Terai – not so far from Lalgadh – hundreds have lost their lives during the past week. August 2016.

The monsoon is here – it’s hot, wet and sticky with frequent heavy rain, thunderstorms and lightning. Lalgadh Leprosy Hospital & Services Centre (LLSC) is on a hill and so is safe (occasional lightning strikes knock out our Internet). The river next to the hospital is flooded.

The monsoon is a joy for farmers in the right areas, as the monsoon is essential for rice planting and transplanting, especially because Nepal faces severe food shortages in many areas.

rice fields Graeme aug 2016

But in other areas the monsoon brings flooding and landslide disasters, as rivers flooded with heavy monsoonal rain, plus melting Himalayan snow and glaciers rush down the Himalayan slopes into valleys, into the flat Terai (where Lalgadh Hospital is situated) and then into India. Landslides are frequent and rip away earthquake-weakened slopes burying villages and destroying roads, and once in the flatlands the waters spread out and causing wide areas of inundation. Hundreds have already died and thousands been made homeless in just the last couple of weeks

At Lalgadh Hospital this is the busy season with increasing illness, water-borne diseases, and swelling patient numbers (500-600 per day). Despite the heat, rains, mud and flooding, and busyness, the 3 major arms of LLSC –
(a) HOSPITAL SERVICES,
(b) COMMUNITY OUTREACH Program,
(c) TRAINING/CAPACITY BUILDING,
carry with that what I’d call mighty perseverance!

LLSC’s COMMUNITY PROGRAM is totally awesome! It provides a spectacular outreach program for many thousands – from leprosy affected, marginalised, untouchable, stigmatised communities in the 4 Districts adjacent to LLSC (2.5 million people). Despite the monsoon rains, mud and flooding it continues its daily operation reaching out to difficult-to-reach poor and needy vlllages where leprosy and other diseases of poverty are still rampant.               Extract from Dr Graeme. Lalgadh Hospital, August 19th 2016.

Loose change.

Loose change, please donate to us.

Especially any unwanted 1c and 2c coins as they can help greatly to support our work. In Nepal the average daily wage is around €1. A small container as pictured can contain about €7 or €8, with a mix of coins. Contact us at info@nlt.ie to discuss further.

€4 can provide a pair of custom made shoes for a patient in our leprosy hospital in Lalgadh, read more here

Unwanted, loose change.
Unwanted, loose change.

Touchable untouchables?

We count it a joy and privilege to serve and envision some of the poorest people on the Earth.

Dalit children

The Musha children seen above are part of a dalit community of  ‘untouchables’ in the Terai of Nepal, that are marginalised by the wider community because of being born into a low caste.

They have no land, and earn their living working for others, earning perhaps a euro a day, when there is work.

Help us help them, with income generation, education, health, sanitation and water projects. Lets give them hope and a dream for their lives.

See details of our Village Alive project.

Contact: info@nlt.ie